Gastonia’s pediatric practice helps children develop better sleep patterns

Gastonia’s pediatric practice insists that quality sleep is vital for the health of the whole family. If you’ve noticed sleep disorders in your child, you are not the only one. However, sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, can result in other health complications. The good news is simple behavioral changes can put this issue behind your back.

What to do with a child with a sleeping disorder?

  1. Search for the stressors and changes
  2. Create a good nightly routine
  3. Check out their sleep space
  4. The transition from needing help to falling asleep
  5. Assist them to get their dose of physical activity
  6. Know your child’s sleep needs

1. Search for the stressors and changes

Kids, like their adult counterparts, can develop sleep issues in the event of big transitions, such as divorce and the death of a family member. Eliminating these stressors can be difficult, but understanding their impact on sleep helps parents to be more understanding and patient. Asthma and allergies are some of the underlying conditions that can also sabotage sleep. It’s best to address the root cause in such circumstances.

2. Create a good nightly routine

Routines help create good sleep habits. A good nightly routine trains the brain to prepare for sleep and can soothe anxiety and lower levels of stimulation. Start by turning off all electronics an hour before bedtime. Light from these devices can interfere with circadian rhythms, making it hard to fall and stay asleep. Late evening time should be used for quiet activities like reading, coloring, and drawing.

3. Check out their sleep space

The answers you seek may as well be within your child’s room. Examine your child’s sleep space by lying on their bed. Could itchy blankets or annoying streetlights be the cause of the disorder? You can always use blinds or blackout curtains to attain darkness. Also, make sure that the room has the right sleeping temperatures every night. That typically ranges from 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

4. The transition from needing help to falling asleep

Children who can put themselves to sleep can go back to sleep should they wake in at night. If your child requires reading, rocking, or singing to fall asleep, it’s best to transition. Send your child to bed on their own after story time with a promise to check on them. Do as promised, but add a minute or two weeks before checking in.

5. Assist them to get their dose of physical activity

Everyone knows that physical activity is good for overall health. But it also enhances the quality and duration of sleep cycles. Kids should exercise for at least an hour every day. Meeting this requirement during cold and hot days calls for creativity.

6. Know your child’s sleep needs

Sleep needs are based on your child’s age and should be adhered to strictly. Your pediatric clinic can let you know your child’s recommended sleep time throughout different stages.

Visit Gastonia’s best pediatric practice

After determining a good evening routine and ruling out health conditions, it may be time to visit a pediatrician if the sleep issues persist. Start by documenting sleep patterns and habits before visiting Gastonia’s best pediatric practice. Gastonia Pediatric Associates, your Gastonia area pediatricians, offers top-quality pediatric care.